Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

         

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

blog warm 0215.jpg

Travel stories, inspiration, news and musing

We are the dreamers, the seekers, the travellers, the adventurers, the optimists. It's nice to meet you! There are lots of us with the same DNA - we look forward to sharing the journey with you.

Filtering by Tag: ethical travel

I'll be home for Christmas

Elissa Webster

Homecoming and what it really means has been on my mind lately – predictably I guess, since we’ve just come back to the Sunshine Coast, Queensland after nearly two years living in Vanuatu. But it’s something that I know lots of other people living away from home ponder too, especially as time marches inexorably on to Christmas, with all of the home-ness that Christmas always inspires.

Read More

The evolution of travel

Aimee Pearce

Once upon a time, there was only one reason I could really see to travel: to experience new things. To see with my own eyes the Eiffel Tower to be sure it was really there; to eat the deep-fried guinea pig to check if I’d been missing out on something spectacular all my life (I hadn’t). My itineraries were infamous for being packed to the brim with places to see; my preferred mode of travel was of the tasting plate variety rather than the house specialty - why dwell on one country/city/sight when you could dip into 12? This means skimming across the top, admittedly, but at least it rules out the possibility of dying without seeing it all - and there’s always the option to go back, once you have run out of new places to explore.

Read More

How long is long enough?

Aimee Pearce

It’s the eternal question for wanderlusters like us: how long? How long do I need to stay? How long could I stay? How long should I stay? Will whatever I’m planning be long enough?

I’ve never been one of those travellers who arrives in a place with no plans, luxuriously free to follow their whims and intent only on seeing what delights are serendipitously dropped in their paths. I wish I was, but honestly, I’m just not. While group tours make my toes curl and I like to think I follow a more authentic travel experience path, I do find it hard to resist drafting long lists of highlights of any given venue and trying to fit in as many of them as my long suffering family will endure. Partly, it’s because thinking about the trip is a big wedge of the travel-pleasure-pie for me, and partly it’s a kind of FOMO – the fear that I might never find myself back in this locale again and dread the thought of lying on my deathbed running through a litany of places I wish I’d seen (and food I wish I’d eaten and people I wish I’d been kinder to) but didn’t.

Read More

Being the other

Aimee Pearce

Here’s the thing – we all want to belong. From surveying the schoolyard for a friend to sit with at lunch, to agreeing to participate in ridiculous team building exercises at work, there’s a part of most of us that craves the feeling of having a place in the place where you are.

Even when the place that you are is your place – the one that you were born in, or that you know as home – feeling like you belong isn’t always easy. Life stages change, friends move, work ends. Stuff happens that makes you feel different to the people around you.

Read More

Things that (unexpectedly) work in Vanuatu

Elissa Webster

Anyone who has travelled anywhere knows that things always work differently to home – sometimes a little bit, and sometimes a lot. When you are just passing through, you notice them, you might even have a little chuckle about them, but you tend not to be bothered too much by them – in fact, they generally add to the charm of being someplace else. It’s not until you spend some time somewhere, put down some roots and get a mailing address, that you really realise that you are properly not in Kansas anymore, Toto. After a while, you start to miss some stuff about home that you’ve never really thought much about before. Some of those things that work differently – some of them begin to grate. Sometimes a little bit, and sometimes a lot. But some of those things that seemed so strange at the beginning actually make more and more sense the deeper in you get.

Read More

The Airbnb conundrum

Aimee Pearce

I'm an Airbnb advocate. For sure. A space created by travellers, for travellers. To stay in privately owned accommodation instead of chain hotels. To gain local knowledge from hosts when you're travelling. What's not to love? It's the perfect platform for travellers right? In fact I love it so much after staying in Airbnb accommodation almost exclusively for our travels over a few years, we decided to set up our own Airbnb property. We built in under our existing home and now rent out our space on Airbnb. We live in paradise, why not share it with other travellers right? [Have a sticky-beak if you're in the market for a Sunshine Coast holiday!].

BUT.. (why do great things always need to have a but???) I've been thinking quite a lot lately about the impact Airbnb is having on the permanent housing market. This isn't a new problem, nor is the housing shortage entirely Airbnb's fault, but as a responsible citizen, (of both the world and my local community) I feel obligated to question the scenario we find ourselves in and ask if there is a way we can do it better.

Read More

Travel lightly: 5 ways to minimise your global footprint while travelling

Aimee Pearce

By it's very nature, travel undeniably impacts on the environment and the people and cultures who are part of the travel process. You can't get from one side of the world to the other without leaving some form of footprint and so as responsible global citizens, there is plenty of room for us to learn how to travel "lighter" and minimise our global footprint. There are loads of buzzwords being thrown around on this topic - from eco travel to green travel and responsible travel to sustainable travel - but what travellers really want to know is how can we implement simple but effective changes to the way we travel in order to really make a difference.

We hear you! That's why we have come up with this list of things you can do to start travelling lightly.

Read More

How to Travel Without Screwing Up the World

Aimee Pearce

It may seem like common sense that our actions have implications. For someone, somewhere. One of Newton's laws is that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. That may actually be one of the only things a remember from high school biology!  But for some reason, not everyone who travels seems to understand or take seriously that our decisions and the choices we make and activities we partake in while "on holidays" really does have an impact on the people, the communities and the culture of the country we are merely passing through. I certainly don't want to come across as condescending - in fact I am the first to admit I have made mistakes while travelling and with knowledge and maturity I would definitely make different decisions now in some situations that I may have found myself in during my late teens and early 20s. And in my early 30s I also don't suppose to be expert on anything! However, I also strongly believe ignorance is NOT bliss under any circumstance. That's actually not good enough!

Read More

On the road with the Grassroots Nomad

Aimee Pearce

Laura Fairbourn AKA the Grassroots Nomad is living the dream. An avid traveller, she has combined her passions for volunteering and slow travel and is currently gallivanting the globe, spending time immersing herself in local culture while volunteering with grassroots, community organisations. Aimée recently interrupted her Spanish studies in Xela, Guatemala to talk all things ethical travel.

Read More